Traditions and rituals of Ramadan

Traditions and rituals of Ramadan

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Ramadan is a special period for practicing Muslims around the world, characterized by spiritual discipline and the pursuit of purification. Rava reviews its most emblematic practices.

The month of fasting is a period of spiritual discipline and purification. Therefore, reading and reciting segments of the Koran - the holy book of Islam - is an integral part of the rituals observed during Ramadan. It is believed that the content of the Qur'an was revealed to the Prophet Muhammad during the month of Ramadan.

The month of fasting is a period of spiritual discipline and purification. Therefore, reading and reciting segments of the Koran – the holy book of Islam – is an integral part of the rituals observed during Ramadan. It is believed that the content of the Qur’an was revealed to the Prophet Muhammad during the month of Ramadan.

After spending a day without eating or drinking water, many Muslims often break the fast by tasting a date, the nutritious fruit with which the Prophet Muhammad allegedly broke his. Then, the practicing Muslims participate in a communal dinner known as "iftar".

After spending a day without eating or drinking water, many Muslims often break the fast by tasting a date, the nutritious fruit with which the Prophet Muhammad allegedly broke his. Then, the practicing Muslims participate in a communal dinner known as “iftar”.

Although Islam prescribes the rituals that should be observed during Ramadan, the traditions practiced by Muslims during that month vary from place to place. In Sarajevo, for example, a cannon is usually fired to mark the end of fasting every day of Ramadan. In Egypt, the display of the "fanous", a lavishly decorated lantern, is another ritual associated with the month of fasting.

Although Islam prescribes the rituals that should be observed during Ramadan, the traditions practiced by Muslims during that month vary from place to place. In Sarajevo, for example, a cannon is usually fired to mark the end of fasting every day of Ramadan. In Egypt, the display of the “fanous”, a lavishly decorated lantern, is another ritual associated with the month of fasting.

Every year, millions of practicing Muslims around the world observe the demands and rituals of the holy month of Islam, which go beyond fasting, praying and giving alms. DW explores the way the occasion is celebrated and what it means for believers.

Every year, millions of practicing Muslims around the world observe the demands and rituals of the holy month of Islam, which go beyond fasting, praying and giving alms. DW explores the way the occasion is celebrated and what it means for believers.

Eid al-Fitr - the feast of breaking the fast - marks the official culmination of Ramadan. It is characterized by the careless ingestion of sweets and the granting of gifts to loved ones. Muslims usually celebrate the end of the holy month with large dinners prepared by friends and family. It is considered a moment of joy, ideal to be kind and generous with others.

Eid al-Fitr – the feast of breaking the fast – marks the official culmination of Ramadan. It is characterized by the careless ingestion of sweets and the granting of gifts to loved ones. Muslims usually celebrate the end of the holy month with large dinners prepared by friends and family. It is considered a moment of joy, ideal to be kind and generous with others.

Contemplating the new moon of Ramadan is a common practice of religious authorities throughout the world. This allows them to determine exactly when the month of fasting begins. Some observe the star with telescopes, but others do it without the aid of any device. Hence, Ramadan begins on different days at various points on the planet.

Contemplating the new moon of Ramadan is a common practice of religious authorities throughout the world. This allows them to determine exactly when the month of fasting begins. Some observe the star with telescopes, but others do it without the aid of any device. Hence, Ramadan begins on different days at various points on the planet.

Praying is often considered a fundamental practice of the month of fasting. Traditionally, Ramadan begins with a special prayer known as Tarawih. During the holy month, many Muslims participate in communal prayers in the mosques closest to their neighborhoods.

Praying is often considered a fundamental practice of the month of fasting. Traditionally, Ramadan begins with a special prayer known as Tarawih. During the holy month, many Muslims participate in communal prayers in the mosques closest to their neighborhoods.

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Rava is an online news portal providing recent news, editorials, opinions and advice on day to day happenings in Pakistan.

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